A101 Dictionary of Movie Terms

B. O'Malley The Archives 0 Comments

archive-a101dictionaryacting
(n.) (1.)interpreting and pretending to be a character in a film. e.g. usage: “That fucking Chevy Chase sure can’t fucking act.”

anamorphic lens
(n.)camera lens that magnifies the horizontal and vertical axes of an image, making people look like Anna.

answer print
(n.) Immediately follows the “question print.”

anticlimax
(n.) Immediately follows the “antisex.”

audience
(n.) any large group of people who petitions major film studios to release more $50-million volcano movies.

auteur
(n.) An autistic filmmaker.

apple box
(n.) A wooden box found on a camera or grip truck, usually used for throwing or smashing.

black leader
(n.) (1.)extra film at the beginning of a reel (2.) Martin Luther King

budget
(n.) (1.) total amount of money to be spent on a film (2.) total amount of money spent on a film.

casting couch
(n.) outdated mythical couch on which aspiring actresses traded sex for movie roles. Replaced by mythical casting futon.

cgi
(n.) Computer Generated Imagery. Hollywood’s new alternative to filmic credibility.

decibel
(n.) Sobething that has bostly to do with the Betric Systeb. Not used very buch in Aberica.

ditty bag
(n.) A bag full of ditties.

double take
(n.) A repetition of the same part of an action.

double take
(n.) A repetition of the same part of an action.

film financing
(n.) Obtaining money for a film’s production and/or post production budget. (2.) Of or pertaining to self-dentistry.

gaffer
(n.) person responsible for gaffing on a film set.

hairstylist
(n.) Clinical engineer on a film set whose primary task is to manipulate the facial and scalp-oriented follicle groupings of an actor or actress portraying a character into a shape, form, and/or texture that is both visually pleasing to an audience and conducive to the actor or actress’s character.

hype
(n.)The process of convincing the public that an upcoming bad film is good.

indie
(n.)Any film written by Kevin Williamson, starring Christina Ricci, and costing $35 million or more to make.

jump cut
(n.) Any jarring transition, such as walking out of “Flintstones” and stepping into “Strap-On Sally 5.”

letterbox
(n.) Videotape degradation characterized by black bars appearing across the top and bottom of the tv screen, most frequently occurring on videotapes acquired from video stores across the American south.

location manager
(n.)Person on a film crew responsible for finding and securing access to any locations used by the production, by blatantly lying to the location owner about the amount of time, crew, and equipment needed to bring onto the premises.

majors
(n.)Any of the four large filmmaking empires, generally held to be Paramount, Warner Bros., Disney, and PepsiCo.

props
(n.) Any and all types of firearms found on a film set. Experiment!

squib
(n.) A piece of cloth worn under the chin while eating squid.

stock footage
(n.) Any film footage shot by a Director of Photography shorter than four feet.

talent
(n.) A film production term for “actor.” Similar terms include “asshead” and “fucky.”

test screening
(n.) A screening of a film for an audience with the sole intent of receiving feedback from the audience. An integral part of the collaborative, communal, and collective creativity of auteur filmmaking.

THX
(n.) A theatrical sound system designed to enhance the moviegoing experience, implemented by George Lucas, prior to Lucas losing his neck.

tracking shot
(n.) A shot made famous by John Ford in which the camera follows the action of a game hunter or an Indian scout (or similar) while pursuing his or her quarry.

UPM
(n.) A film production’s Unit Production Manager, primarily responsible for the dietary concerns of the talent and the amount of air traffic in the immediate area.

voiceover
(n.)The next logical step up from the overused film gimmick, the voiceunder.

walla
(n.) The east side of Walla-Walla. Or the west. Depending on pronunciation.

whip pan
(n.) Any movement of the camera across the lens’ viewing plane by any member of Devo.

working title
(n.) A film’s temporary title, used during production to discourage media leaks, or until a better title is found, or until a committee decides the writer was incorrect.

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